Death Du Jour (Temperance Brennan Novels)

Death Du Jour (Temperance Brennan Novels)

Death Du Jour (Temperance Brennan Novels)

Forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs exploded onto bestseller lists worldwide with her phenomenal debut novel Déjà Dead — and introduced “[a] brilliant heroine” (Glamour) in league with Patricia Cornwell’s Kay Scarpetta. Dr. Temperance Brennan, Quebec’s director of forensic anthropology, now returns in a thrilling new investigation into the secrets of the dead. In the bitter cold of a Montreal winter, Tempe Brennan is digging for a corpse buried more than a century ago. Although Tempe thrive

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206 Bones

206 Bones

‘You have an enemy, Dr Brennan. It is in your interest to learn who placed that call’. A routine case turns sinister when Dr Temperance Brennan is accused of mishandling the autopsy of a missing heiress. Someone has made an incriminating accusation that she missed or concealed crucial evidence. Before Tempe can get to the one man with information, he turns up dead. The heiress isn’t the only elderly female to have appeared on Tempe’s gurney recently. Back in Montreal, three more women have died,

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6 Comments/Reviews

  • April "Cheshire Meow" says:
    31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    Too many coincidences ruined it for me., October 27, 1999
    By A Customer
    This review is from: Death du Jour (Hardcover)

    For the first 25 pages I was enthralled by the writing and the forensics. Then the coincidences piled up: 1. In Quebec, Tempe investigates the fiery death of a family (later found to be killed by a quasi-religious cult.) 2. In a totally separate storyline, Tempe is asked by a nun acquaintance to find the nun’s missing niece … who JUST HAPPENS to have links to the first murder. 3. Weeks later, Tempe’s relaxing on an island off the Carolina coast when she JUST HAPPENS to discover the buried bodies of two murdered women. Guess what? This new crime JUST HAPPENS to be related to those murders way up north in Quebec. 4. Tempe’s troubled sister, living in ANOTHER state, JUST HAPPENS to have recently joined the same murderous cult responsible for all these murders! Tempe doesn’t have to pursue the investigation — the clues just come flying to her from points all over North America. I am amazed that so many self-described mystery buffs do not even comment on these faults in their reviews. Did they not notice them? Or are they so dazzled by the forensic details (which are indeed excellent)that they forgot the basics of a believable plot?

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  • Anonymous says:
    27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Exciting, so don’t start reading it before bedtime., July 26, 2000
    By 
    April “Cheshire Meow” (Everett, WA, United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    A different kind of professional female sleuth with the feel of non-fiction fiction. The author is a real-life forensic anthropologist for the State of North Carolina, and is also a professor at The University of North Carolina. The author’s character has been divorced, has a ‘wacky’ sister and a grown-up daughter,is working for the Province of Quebec and teaches at university as well. Dr. Temperance Brennan, the first person narrator, has co-workers who hate her and a male detective who irritates and attracts her. Real excitement is constantly being created because the distractions caused by her personal life interfere with her sleuthing, which the reader can figure out by a few minutes. Despite the University credentials of both character and author, the book is very readable and fast. If bone science doesn’t give you the creeps, I suggest taking this book with you on summer vacation. (There is a lot of snowing in the book,a mental boost if the sun is getting too much.)

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  • Anonymous says:
    17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    This Novel’s Better than her First – Recommended Reading, May 23, 1999
    By A Customer
    This review is from: Death du Jour (Hardcover)

    I bought the author’s 1st book, Deja Dead, because I was glad to have found another female medical examiner protagonist similar to Cornwell’s Dr. Scarpetta. Still, Deja Dead (Reichs’ 1st novel) wasn’t as good as when Cornwell is at her, now, occasional best. Death Du Jour, being another Dr. Brennan novel, was a very welcome sight. Then after reading Death Du Jour you see there is a definite improvement over Deja Dead. Reich’s story telling skills have improved considerably; now the author really communicates with, and grabs, the reader – she keeps the book moving. I read so many books and not many lately have kept my attention as this one has. If you were iffy with Deja Dead give it another chance with this book.

    My only gripe is her wacky sister. Not only was there absolutely no need for her but she took something away from the story and the main character. They are way too different and not believable at all. But not for the sister’s appearance I would have rated it 5 stars.

    I’ll anxiously await and will buy Reichs next book (new character or not) when it comes out. I hope the author doesn’t feel the need to constantly inject family members into her story as Cornwell has done; ruining many storylines by focusing on the neice (a consensus among all my reader friends). We all want to read about the character and her unique professional encounters not her relatives.

    Congratulations to Ms. Reich on an excellent and intelligent read.

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  • Renate Schneider says:
    48 of 53 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Here Come the Latvians, August 26, 2009
    By 

    Being a Chicagoan, I very much enjoyed all the references to my city at the beginning of this novel.After several books that provided some background on Tempe (her sister, Harry; her family background)it was fun to read about her estranged husband’s family, a lively bunch of Latvians!I found that this book, like the others, pulls me in, and what I anticipate will be “just a chapter or two” of reading invariably ends hours later, when I have finished the book, and the day is gone.The plots move quickly, and I just have to know what happens next, much to the detriment of my plans for the day. There have already been several reviews that discuss the plot; I see no point in belaboring that, except to say that there is always new knowledge to be gained, but the story line is fast paced and never preachy.I like that the author’s passion for her profession comes through. It is still my fervent hope that Tempe ends up with Claudel and not Ryan, and I eagerly await the next book in hopes that Tempe’s fascination with Ryan’s blue eyes will be replaced by appreciation of Claudel’s sartorial splendor!

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  • E. Bukowsky "booklover10" says:
    89 of 105 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    “Something’s very wrong.”, July 28, 2009
    By 
    E. Bukowsky “booklover10″ (NY United States) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)
      
    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    “206 Bones,” by Kathy Reichs, opens with Tempe Brennan realizing, to her horror, that she has been handcuffed and buried in some sort of underground crypt. She does not remember how she got there, but is understandably terrified. The author then traces the complicated series of events that led up to Tempe’s abduction and entombment.

    For the uninitiated, Temperance Brennan is a renowned forensic anthropologist who divides her time between laboratories in Montreal and the North Carolina. Her pal and partner in detection is the hunky Lieutenant-détective Andrew Ryan, who works for the Sûreté du Québec. The two have an on-again, off-again romance that is currently off, although they remain good friends. Tempe and Ryan have their hands full probing several convoluted mysteries, including the deaths of three elderly females as well as that of a fifty-nine year old woman whose body was found thirty months after she disappeared in Quebec. As a favor to a friend, they also try to learn the fate of a young man who fell or was thrown into a quarry. Ryan spends many hours tracking down potential witnesses and searching for physical evidence, while Tempe follows up leads of her own and carefully studies skeletal remains.

    Reichs’ strength lies in her encyclopedic knowledge of forensic anthropology. When Tempe talks bones, we listen. In addition, the author skillfully captures the bleakness of a harsh Montreal winter, with its icy temperatures, slick roads, and heavy snowfall. The bitter weather is a fitting counterpoint to Tempe’s mood. She is indignant that some of her colleagues are challenging her competence, especially an ambitious newcomer named Marie-Andréa Briel. The reader suffers, as well, because Tempe’s inquiries are not all that interesting. They lack the suspense and nail-biting tension that we have come to expect from this talented author. This is a talky novel with too much cutesy dialogue, and the author telegraphs the identity of the villains far too soon. When the bad guys are unmasked, few will be surprised. Another annoying element is Ryan and Tempe’s silly banter; these two act more like lovesick teenagers than mature adults. “206 Bones” offers little suspense, a drawn-out and dull plot, and almost no character development. This series may be close to running its course.

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  • Skunk Tabby says:
    25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Fast, entertaining read, August 29, 2009
    By 
    Skunk Tabby (Washington, DC) –

    Customer review from the Amazon Vine™ Program (What’s this?)

    I read this in an afternoon–always a good sign. While I haven’t read all of Kathy Reichs’ books, I have really enjoyed the ones that I have. If you’re a fan, you’ll enjoy this one–a good mix of the familiar and the new. If you’re a fan of the TV series, try not to think of the books as having any relation to the show–they’re completely different in tone, style, and depth. I always prefer the books set in Montreal, as this one is, because I enjoy reading about its rich history. The book does serve up plenty of that. I don’t want to get into plot-specifics because it is a mystery and why spoil the fun? But the characters, both main and supporting, are well-drawn and realistic, if not relatable.

    The book loses a star for a blindingly obvious suspect that went unnoticed until the end and tangents that serve only to slow down the reader and show off the author’s researching and/or trivia skills. Also, the very, very end devolves into what feels like a self-serving (although probably justifiable) tirade about qualifications to be a forensic anthropologist. While she may have a point, it was about a subtle as an anvil to the forehead and brought the book to a screeching halt. Granted, it was the last page so halting is to be expected, but the tone just didn’t fit in with the overall book. But since I enjoyed the book, I’ll let it go. This time.

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